tradding game demo It is 7 AM, I’m at the hotel entrance in Jamshedpur, and I am greeted by Arjun on his motorbike. This young, 21-year-old affable activist is Arjun Samat. “Where is your cycle?”, was his first question. When I tell people, I’m on a cycling expedition; they usually expect to see the bike by my side at all times. We go to Turamdih, 5 km from Jamshedpur, which is among the more recent of five Uranium mines that were started by the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, back in 1954 when it initiated India’s first Uranium mining. This is on the Howrah-Mumbai main line and was commissioned in 2003.

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http://shortcreek.us/?enfiors=dating-16-year-old-illegal&7eb=f0 I am visiting a nuclear mine area for the first time and all sorts of thoughts are running through my mind. One part of me is super excited to be in a place that has the potential to power us all with a supposedly clean means of energy. I had wrongly assumed that it is a clean source of energy since it does not produce visible smoke like a thermal coal power plant. The horrors of nuclear mining were soon to be discovered by me. While the other part is scared that these mines also provide the raw material for nuclear warheads used by our army, capable of decimating entire nations populations.

opcje binarne co to “One of the most sensitive and important parts of nuclear mining is done by the contractual labor at ₹300 a day”, Arjun tells me. “They are hardly given any medical or health benefits, no protective suits or safety gear. In fact, a few months ago, in May 2016, there was an accident, where a section of the mine collapsed, and two workers lost their lives inside one of the mines. The families seldom receive any compensation for deaths occurring during work”. The mine workers come back from a failed attempt to negotiate health check ups by the company and take me in, on their sombreness.

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http://fgsk.de/?kraevid=bin%C3%A4re-optionen-automatisch&1df=b3 We head over to a tailing pond on Arjun’s motorbike. A tailing pond is where the tailings i.e. uranium mining waste, in the form of a slurry, are stored in an artificially constructed pond. The pond may be lined at the bottom, or not. In this case, the pond isn’t lined, as informed by Arjun. “This is a 64-acre tailing pond and takes the waste of uranium ore processing from the nearby plant.

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enter site We head over to a tailing pond on Arjun’s motorbike. A tailing pond is where the tailings i.e. uranium mining waste, in the form of a slurry, are stored in an artificially constructed pond. The pond may be lined at the bottom, or not. In this case, the pond isn’t lined, as informed by Arjun. “This is a 64-acre tailing pond and takes the waste of uranium ore processing from the nearby plant.

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source site “This radioactive slurry is being stored in the open, doesn’t this pose any health and environmental hazards?”, I ask. Arjun smiles at me and says, “You understand this basic fact, but somehow the DAE (Department of Atomic Energy) and BARC (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre) officials don’t acknowledge this.” “Has the pond ever overflown?” I shudder at that thought. “Yes, in 2003, it rained a lot, continuously. The tailing pond overflowed into the neighboring farms. It killed all the crops that year. Not only that but some small animals too, died by drinking that water. The groundwater has been polluted, and the company won’t admit it. However, they have asked the nearby villages to stop using ground water and are instead being told to take water from the multiple water points installed by the company. During summers, the slurry dries up and gets carried by the wind all around the pond, to neighboring villages.”

go site My mind is buzzing with questions and emotions. The thought of utter disregard for environmental and health safety laws while handling something as sensitive as the radioactive Uranium ore makes me sick to my stomach. I visit a small habitation merely few meters from the wall that UCIL has built around the tailing point on one side. The village is deserted as most of the people have gone to earn their daily wage. In one corner, a toddler is kicking his pet cat while lying down on a charpai. Hen are pecking at the ground for leftover grains after the child’s mother is done washing rice for their afternoon meal. These are scenes from any village, except that the toddler may be inhaling radioactive dust while his mother might be washing and cooking with water that has radioactive remnants from the Uranium sludge nearby.

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